Cinema and evangelisation

Cinema and evangelisation

Blogging occasionally offers unexpected side-benefits. I’ve just watched a full preview of The Identical — a film which won’t be released in US cinemas until September. Who knows when it will hit Australian screens?

All I have to do in return is write a review. Not an advertisement or an endorsement, but an honest review. Sweet!

I’ll write the review some other time. First, I want to consider the marketing of this film. The Identical was described to me as “a Christian film,” which in my mind conjures unfortunate and unwanted associations with Fireproof and Courageous. The production values of those films meet Hollywood-standards, but the acting is mediocre, and the writing is very heavy-handed. I’d call it “excruciating in its preachiness.”

To clarify, Fireproof and Courageous are movies I enjoyed. I would consider showing them in a parish setting. But I wouldn’t show them to secular friends anymore than I would bash them over the head with my bulky Jerusalem Bible, or hand them The Catechism of the Catholic Church as recommended reading.

There’s smarter ways to evangelise secular friends. I’ve often recommended C.S. Lewis’ Screwtape Letters — the book and the radio play — as a user-friendly introduction to supernatural outlook. In the past six months, I’ve given away several copies of Matthew Kelly’s Rediscover Catholicism. And I’ll never forget the life-changing impact St Josemaría Escrivá’s The Way had on me, which is why I’m always ready to share that book with others.

Movies can evangelise too. By that, I mean they can sow seeds. Subtly. In a way foreign to Fireproof and Courageous.

Of course, the danger of subtlety is that the message can become so subtle that it is lost. Don Jon is a case in point. A year ago, I was lauding the film — albeit cautiously. Since then I’ve read enough reviews to know that Don Jon is part of the problem it claimed to critique, and I don’t regret its aborted release in Australia.

The Identical, however, is a much more successful effort at subtle and effective evangelisation. Again, by that I mean it can sow seeds, presenting the Christian faith in a positive light, and engaging in the big issues which faith tackles. Ain’t nobody gonna convert after watching this movie. But they’re not going to sin either, which really is something when you consider the moral sewerage Hollywood retails these days.

The beauty of The Identical is that it meets Hollywood production values and it has a superb cast of recognisable and talented actors and its Christian themes are universal. That’s the genius of Christianity at its best, of course. It speaks to the universal human condition.

Consider this trailer, which is cut for secular audiences.

And then consider this “faith trailer,” promoting exactly the same film:

Both trailers do justice to the film they represent, but they’re a fascinating study in contrasts.

3 Comments

  1. MuMu
    Aug 18, 2014

    I believe film is the most powerful medium of evangelisation, Father John, but how can one learn the subtle and delicate art of apologetics? Would someone please put on a permanently running course to teach us how (and how not) to speak to others about the faith?

    Is it supposed to be simple?

    Anyone out there with any ideas?

    The only way I know how is to pray to the Holy Spirit for the opportunity and the words, but I’d like to study the most effective ways…

  2. Clara
    Aug 19, 2014

    Have you come across Act One for Hollywood? http://www.actoneprogram.com They eschew schmaltzy christian writing in favour of well crafted high end movie making.

  3. Alex Lim
    Aug 24, 2014

    Yes, cinema is the most power form of communication, and be extension, evangelization. Most of the 20th century has seen that that power. But the internet has taken much of that power in the 21st Century. But I digress. So what films has the Vatican produced or caused to be produced that harnesses the film’s communicative power to evangelize?